British Cycling targets women

 

British Cycling targets women
Plans set out to get one million more women on bikes by 2020
British Cycling today set out ambitious plans to get one million more women riding bikes by 2020 at an event hosted at the Department for Culture, Media and Sport in London. 
The new strategy, supported by Culture Secretary Maria Miller, Sport England and British Cycling’s Principal Partner, Sky, covers getting more women into the sport at all levels from recreational riding and racing to volunteering and sitting on British Cycling’s Board.
The new strategy includes building on the success of mass participation events like Sky Ride and Breeze, continuing to campaign for safer roads for all cyclists, setting up entry-level racing opportunities for women and recruiting more female coaches, volunteers and officials into the sport to ensure more women are influencing and running the sport at the grassroots.
British Cycling’s President, Brian Cookson OBE, said: 
“At British Cycling, in partnership with Sky and Sport England, we have never been scared of a challenge, nor of setting ambitious targets. Whether it is winning eight gold medals at a home Olympics four years after the triumphs of Beijing, producing the first British winner of the Tour de France or getting a million people cycling, when we set ourselves goals, we set about them with seriousness and purpose. We are not saying we are going to be perfect, far less that we are perfect now. The direction of travel is important: our ultimate aim is to inspire one million more women to get on bikes and we are determined to make this happen.”
Double track world champion Becky James:  
“Knowing that my success can inspire other young women to get into cycling makes me feel really good. The performances of our female riders at Beijing and in London have already made a difference, now we just need to see more women doing everyday cycling and enjoying our amazing sport for all that it has to offer.”
GB cycling team Olympian Jess Varnish said: 
“If we can realise this ambition it will go a long way to refreshing cycling’s image so it is not seen as a sport only for men in lycra. The best thing about cycling is that anyone can do it, and in whatever form they like. I’m looking forward to seeing more women riding bikes and, most importantly, enjoying every moment.”
Speaking at the event, Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, Maria Miller, said:
“Cycling in Britain is in great shape after a fantastic London 2012, and it is fantastic that the sport wants to go further and get more women on their bikes. The likes of Becky James and Jess Varnish will inspire many other young women, and British Cycling’s plan shows that it is a sport that women 

British Cycling yesterday set out ambitious plans to get one million more women riding bikes by 2020 at an event hosted at the Department for Culture, Media and Sport in London. 

 


The new strategy, supported by Culture Secretary Maria Miller, Sport England and British Cycling’s Principal Partner, Sky, covers getting more women into the sport at all levels from recreational riding and racing to volunteering and sitting on British Cycling’s Board.


The new strategy includes building on the success of mass participation events like Sky Ride and Breeze, continuing to campaign for safer roads for all cyclists, setting up entry-level racing opportunities for women and recruiting more female coaches, volunteers and officials into the sport to ensure more women are influencing and running the sport at the grassroots.


British Cycling’s President, Brian Cookson OBE, said: 


“At British Cycling, in partnership with Sky and Sport England, we have never been scared of a challenge, nor of setting ambitious targets. Whether it is winning eight gold medals at a home Olympics four years after the triumphs of Beijing, producing the first British winner of the Tour de France or getting a million people cycling, when we set ourselves goals, we set about them with seriousness and purpose. We are not saying we are going to be perfect, far less that we are perfect now. The direction of travel is important: our ultimate aim is to inspire one million more women to get on bikes and we are determined to make this happen.”


Double track world champion Becky James:  


“Knowing that my success can inspire other young women to get into cycling makes me feel really good. The performances of our female riders at Beijing and in London have already made a difference, now we just need to see more women doing everyday cycling and enjoying our amazing sport for all that it has to offer.”


GB cycling team Olympian Jess Varnish said: 


“If we can realise this ambition it will go a long way to refreshing cycling’s image so it is not seen as a sport only for men in lycra. The best thing about cycling is that anyone can do it, and in whatever form they like. I’m looking forward to seeing more women riding bikes and, most importantly, enjoying every moment.”


Speaking at the event, Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, Maria Miller, said:

 

“Cycling in Britain is in great shape after a fantastic London 2012, and it is fantastic that the sport wants to go further and get more women on their bikes. The likes of Becky James and Jess Varnish will inspire many other young women, and British Cycling’s plan shows that it is a sport that women can embrace at every level.”

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